Science, Technology and Engineering

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND ENGINEERING

The courses in Science and Technology serve two objectives: 1) to insure that those individuals who desire to pursue science-related studies and careers will be prepared with a good foundation necessary to continue further education and training and 2) to provide students with a challenging learning environment to attain a common core of knowledge, concepts, skills, analytical methods and strategies to become responsible citizens and successful problem solvers in a changing world. Students now have the additional requirement of passing a science MCAS test for graduation. All ninth graders will be expected to take this exam in the spring.

Four credits in Science and Technology are required for graduation. Students must complete Biology and either Physics or Chemistry prior to graduation. Colleges, technical schools, and schools of nursing, etc., may have additional requirements. If a student intends to pursue a career in the scientific, technical, medical, or allied health fields, a minimum of 4 credits in the sciences plus additional coursework in technology is highly recommended. Students pursuing careers in these areas should also pay close attention to mathematics requirements for these fields.

Technology courses include Computer Aided Design, Animation, TV Production, and a variety of Computer Science courses. Many 21st Century careers require expertise in the area of technology. Exploratory and advanced experiences are provided for students to introduce them to technology and its applications. Students also gain information in many of the courses on how to prepare for professions and careers. Skills development in these areas of technology will be a focus of the courses and will include problem solving skills.

The recommended course sequence for Science Courses is as follows:

Grade Honors/AP CP

9 Biology Biology

10* Chemistry Chemistry or Science Choice

11* Physics or Science Choice Physics or Chemistry or Science Choice

12 Science Choice Science Choice

*Some tenth and eleventh grade students will be placed into a two semester course designed for a more focused treatment of Human Biology and Ecology based upon performance on the Biology MCAS.

Science Choice classes include Advanced Placement offerings, Astronomy, Marine Ecology, Environmental Science, Anatomy and Physiology, and Bioethical Issues.

522 Biology 1 Level: CP                         1 STE Credit
Prerequisites: None                                                                                                                                       Grade 9, 10

Prerequisite Skills: College Prep level Biology requires students to use analytical, reading, and writing skills.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete 4 Core Assignments (laboratory reports and projects), and to complete 2-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. The course focuses on six basic themes: the Chemistry of Life, Cell Biology, Ecology, Genetics, Evolution and Biodiversity, and Anatomy and Physiology. Each theme is studied using student-centered activities, lecture, laboratory experiments, and reading assignments.

508 Biology 1 Level: H                      1 STE Credit
Grade 9, 10
Prerequisites: Three of the following four criteria must be met: a Trimester 1 and 2 average of 90 or better in 8th grade science, a score indicating proficiency on the midyear exam, a qualifying score on a science open response, and teacher recommendation. Students who do not meet these prerequisites will be expected to participate in additional support in order to be successful in this class.

Prerequisite Skills: Honors level Biology requires students to possess independent and strong reading and writing skills as well as analytical and graphing skills.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete 4 Core Assignments (laboratory reports and projects), and to complete 3-5 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. The course focuses on six basic themes: the Chemistry of Life, Cell Biology, Ecology, Genetics, Evolution and Biodiversity, and Anatomy and Physiology. Each theme is studied using student-centered activities, lecture, laboratory experiments, and reading assignments with a focus on independent learning and inquiry.

501 AP Biology 9 Level: AP            1 STE Credit
Grade 9
Prerequisite: Students will need to meet all of the requirements for placement into Honors Biology and earn a qualifying score on AP Biology entrance exam. Students will be expected to complete two sets of summer work as a condition of enrollment in order to prepare students for the rigors of an AP course as a 9th grade student.

Prerequisite Skills: AP Bio is a second year advanced biology course. Students must possess strong independent reading, analytical, and problem solving skills to succeed in this class

Expectations: Students are expected to complete rigorous course and lab work consistent with college level Biology and to complete 5-8 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. This is a rigorous course that is modeled after a college level Introductory Biology course and follows the curriculum prescribed for an AP Biology course. Lab work including modeling, scientific questioning, experimental planning, data collection, and data analysis is a significant part of the coursework. The course will culminate with an independent research/experiment project. This is an in depth look at some of the major concepts in Biology. Students will prepare and be required to take the AP Biology exam and the state administered Biology MCAS exam.

530 AP Biology Level: AP           1 STE Credit
Grade 10- 12
Prerequisite: Completion of Honors level Biology and Chemistry as well as teacher recommendation. A score of 85% or higher on the Biology mid-year exam for students entering 10th grade. Students who do not meet these prerequisites will be expected to participate in additional support in order to be successful in this class. A teacher’s recommendation is required.

Prerequisite Skills: AP Bio is a second year advanced biology course. Students must possess strong independent reading, analytical, and problem solving skills to succeed in this class

Expectations: Students are expected to complete rigorous course and lab work consistent with college level Biology and to complete 5-8 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. This is a rigorous course that is modeled after a college level Introductory Biology course and follows the curriculum prescribed for an AP Biology course. Lab work including modeling, scientific questioning, experimental planning, data collection, and data analysis is a significant part of the coursework. The course will culminate with an independent research/experiment project. This is an in depth look at some of the major concepts in Biology. Students will prepare and be required to take the AP Biology exam. All students are required to complete a summer assignment.

540 Human Biology Level: CP   0.5 Credit
Prerequisite: None                                                                                                                                       Grade 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite Skills: Human Biology requires students to read and write scientific materials in a supportive environment. Placement is based on performance on the Biology MCAS and successful completion of Biology.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete 4 Core Assignments (laboratory reports and projects), and to complete 2-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. This course is a one semester course that explores Biology from the point of view of the Human Body. Students will review Cell Biology and Genetics before studying the systems of the Human Body.

550 Ecology Level: CP               0.5 Credit
Prerequisite: None                                                                                                                                    Grade 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite Skills: Ecology requires students to read and write scientific materials in a supportive environment. Placement is based on performance on the Biology MCAS and successful completion of Biology.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete 4 Core Assignments (laboratory reports and projects), and to complete 2-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. This course is a one semester course that explores Biology from the point of view of Ecology. Students will study Ecology including biotic and abiotic factors that influence ecosystem. The influences of ecosystems on evolution will also be explored.
523 Chemistry 1 Level: CP   1 STE Credit
Grade 10, 11, 12
Prerequisites: Geometry (co-enrollment in Algebra 2 is recommended), Biology 1 and a qualifying score on a mathematical assessment. Students who do not meet these prerequisites will be expected to participate in additional support in order to be successful in this class.

Prerequisite Skills: College Prep level Chemistry requires students to use analytical skills to conceptually and mathematically solve problems.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete 4 Core Assignments (laboratory reports and projects), and to complete 2-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. . This course covers the most frequent theories of the nature of matter and its interaction. Major emphasis will be on chemical interactions from both a descriptive and mathematical approach. The student will derive conclusions from laboratory experiments and solving problems.

518 Chemistry 1 Level: H   1 STE Credit
Grade 10, 11, 12
Prerequisites: Biology 1 H, co-enrollment in Honors Algebra 2 or the successful completion of a supplemental mathematics packet specific to the skills needed in an honors science class. Students currently enrolled in Honors science courses should have an average grade of B- or better for quarters 1 and 2 and a qualifying score on a mathematical assessment. Students currently enrolled in College Prep level science courses should have an average grade of A- or a score greater than 85% on the midyear assessment in Biology. Students who do not meet these prerequisites will be expected to participate in additional support in order to be successful in this class.

Prerequisite Skills: Honors level Chemistry requires students to use strong mathematical skills to analyze data and solve problems with increasing complexity. Students must also be able to read and comprehend scientific material.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete 4 Core Assignments (laboratory reports and projects), and to complete 3-5 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. Emphasis is placed on a theoretical and mathematical approach to the more advanced concepts of the nature of matter and its chemical interactions, with an equal stress on accurate and meaningful laboratory experiences. The combination of this course and AP Chemistry is designed to approximate the essentials of first year college chemistry.

519 AP Chemistry Level: AP        1 STE Credit
Grade 10, 11, 12
Prerequisites: B+ or better in Honors level Chemistry or a score of 85% or higher on the Chemistry midyear exam as well as teacher recommendation and a qualifying score on a mathematical assessment. Students in tenth grade considering placing out of the first year Chemistry course will need a qualifying score on a placement assessment that is in place of the Chemistry midyear grade requirement.

Prerequisite Skills: AP Chemistry is a second year advanced chemistry course. Students must possess strong mathematical, problem solving, and laboratory skills to succeed in this class. Students must be co-enrolled in or have completed Pre-Calculus or the successful completion of a supplemental mathematics packet specific to the skills needed in AP Chemistry.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete rigorous course and lab work consistent with college level Chemistry and to complete 5-8 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. This course will follow the curriculum prescribed for an AP Chemistry class. Students will prepare and be required to take the AP Chemistry exam. AP Chemistry emphasizes chemical calculations and the mathematical formulations of principles. Instruction is provided in five key areas, including (1) the structure of matter, in which atomic theory and chemical bonding are discussed, (2) phases of matter, (3) chemical reactions, emphasizing stoichiometry, equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics, and (4) descriptive chemistry analyzing relationships and trends in the periodic table. The final component involves (5) a laboratory experience, in which students will develop and perform chemical experiments in order to build upon group collaboration, data manipulation, and communication of scientific results through formally-written laboratory reports. All students are required to complete a summer assignment. Students who take AP Chemistry as a first year course will have an additional substantive summer assignment.
544 Physics Level: CP             1 STE Credit                                                                                               Grade 11, 12
Prerequisites: Algebra 2 (co-enrollment in Pre-Calculus is recommended or the successful completion of a supplemental mathematics packet specific to the skills needed in an honors science class), Chemistry 1 and a qualifying score on a mathematical assessment. Students who do not meet these prerequisites will be expected to participate in additional support in order to be successful in this class.

Prerequisite Skills: College Prep level Physics requires students to use analytical skills to conceptually and mathematically solve problems.
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Expectations: Students are expected to complete 6 Core Assignments (laboratory reports and projects), and to complete 2-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. This course is an analytical and conceptual treatment of physical phenomenon. The topics studied will include the study of motion, forces on objects, energy, heat, sound and light waves, electricity and magnetism. This course will use real world examples and basic mathematical strategies to illustrate physics concepts and solve physics problems. A scientific calculator will be required for this course.

539 Physics Level: H        1 STE Credit
Grade 11, 12
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 H, co-enrollment in Pre-Calculus H or the successful completion of a supplemental mathematics packet specific to the skills needed in an honors science class. Students currently enrolled in Honors science courses should have an average grade of B- or better for quarters 1and 2 and a qualifying score on a mathematical assessment. Students currently enrolled in College Prep level science courses should have an average grade of A- or a score greater than 85% on the midyear assessment in Chemistry. Students who do not meet these prerequisites are expected to participate in additional support in order to be successful in this class.

Prerequisite Skills: Honors level Physics requires students to use strong mathematical skills to analyze data and solve problems with increasing complexity.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete 6 Core Assignments (laboratory reports and projects), and to complete 3-5 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. This course is a mathematics-based treatment of physical phenomenon. The topics studied will include kinematics, forces, mechanical energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity and electro-magnetism. The course will emphasize mathematical problem solving. A TI-80 series graphing calculator is used in this course.

500 Advanced Placement Physics 1 Level: AP                 1 STE Credit
Grade 11,  12
Prerequisites: A- or better in Honors level Chemistry or a score of 88% or higher on the chemistry midyear exam as well as teacher recommendation and a qualifying score on a mathematical assessment. Students must be co-enrolled or have completed in Pre-Calculus.

Prerequisite Skills: AP Physics 1 is a first year, algebra-based advanced physics course. Students must possess strong mathematical and problem solving skills to succeed in this class.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete rigorous course and lab work consistent with college level Physics and to complete 5-8 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. This course will follow the curriculum prescribed for an AP Physics 1 class. Students will prepare and be required to take the AP Physics exam. AP Physics 1: Algebra-Based is the equivalent to a first semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. This course assumes that students will be able to solve problems independently and have a high level of math skill. A TI-80 series graphing calculator is used in this course.

504 Advanced Placement Physics C Level: AP 1 STE Credit
Grade 12
Prerequisites: B+ or better in Honors level Physics or a score of 85% or higher on the Physics midyear exam as well as teacher recommendation. Students must be co-enrolled in or have completed Calculus.

Prerequisite Skills: AP Physics C is a second year advanced physics course. Students must possess strong mathematical and problem solving skills to succeed in this class.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete rigorous course and lab work consistent with college level
Physics and to complete 5-8 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. This course will follow the curriculum prescribed for an AP Physics C – Mechanics class. Students will prepare and be required to take the AP Physics exam. AP Physics C – Mechanics presents the areas of mechanics and wave phenomena. The course stresses both the mathematical and the practical applications of the topics being studied. A significant amount of class time is spent doing laboratory investigations. The topics addressed in this course include one and two-dimensional motion, Newton’s laws of motion, work and energy, momentum, circular motion and gravitation, rotational dynamics, periodic motion, and geometric optics. Analysis of these topics will use calculus where appropriate. This course assumes that students will be able to solve problems independently and have a high level of math skill. A TI-80 series graphing calculator is used in this course.

574 Environmental Science Level: CP                  1 STE Credit
Grade 10, 11, 12
Prerequisites: Biology 1 and teacher recommendation, and department approval

Prerequisite Skills: Students will be expected to utilize standard scientific methods through student-centered activities, discussions, laboratory experiments, and reading assignments with a focus on independent learning and inquiry.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete 4 Core Assignments (laboratory reports and projects), and to complete 2-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. Environmental Science is designed to provide students with the scientific principles and concepts needed to understand the relationships between organisms and their environment. Students will identify and analyze environmental problems caused by both natural causes and human actions. They will also study possible solutions to these problems. Topics covered include ecology, population dynamics, energy, resource management and pollution.

538 Environmental Science Level: H             1 STE Credit                                                       Grade 11, 12
Prerequisites: Biology 1 and Chemistry 1 H, teacher recommendation, and department approval.

Prerequisite Skills: Students will be expected to utilize standard scientific methods through student-centered activities, discussions, laboratory experiments, and reading assignments with a focus on independent learning and inquiry.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete 4- 6 Core Assignments (laboratory reports and projects), and to complete 3-5 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. Environmental Science is designed to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies needed to understand the interrelationships between organisms and their environment. Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary course where students will identify and analyze environmental problems. Topics covered include energy conversions, changing natural systems, biochemical systems, technology and the human impact on the environment, cultural and socio-economic factors, and development of practices that will achieve a sustainable world.

502 Advanced Placement Environmental Science Level: AP 1 STE Credit                            Grade 11, 12
Prerequisites: Biology 1 and Chemistry 1 H, teacher recommendation, and department approval.

Prerequisite Skills: Students will be expected to utilize standard scientific methods through student-centered activities, discussions, laboratory experiments, and reading assignments with a focus on independent learning and inquiry. Environmental Science is interdisciplinary. Students must possess strong mathematical and problem solving skills to succeed in this class.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete a summer assignment and 6 Core Assignments (laboratory reports and projects), and to complete 5-8 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. AP Environmental Science is designed to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world and to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human made. The following themes will provide a foundation for the course: energy conversions, changing natural systems, biochemical systems, technology and human impact on the environment, cultural and socio-economic factors, and development of practices that will achieve a sustainable world. Students will prepare for and be required to take the AP Environmental Exam.
554 Anatomy & Physiology Level: CP 1 STE Credit
Grade 10, 11, 12
Prerequisites: A grade of B- in Biology as well as teacher recommendation is a requirement for enrollment in this class. Students who do not meet these prerequisites will be expected to participate in additional support in order to be successful in this class.

Prerequisite Skills: College Prep level Anatomy & Physiology requires students to use reading, critical thinking, analytical and basic laboratory skills to be successful in all aspects of the course.

Expectations: A systematic survey of the structures and functions of the major systems of the human body, this course is a lab oriented course in which the fetal pig is dissected. Emphasis is placed on the causative agents for the normal and abnormal functioning of the systems. Students are expected to complete 2-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects as well as a research-based projects and presentations.

557 Anatomy and Physiology Level: H 1 STE Credit
Grade 10,11,12
Prerequisites: A grade of A- in Biology as well as teacher recommendation is a requirement for enrollment in this class. Students who do not meet these prerequisites will be expected to participate in additional support in order to be successful in this class.

Prerequisite Skills: Honors level Anatomy & Physiology requires students to use independent reading skills and strong critical thinking, analytical and basic laboratory skills to be successful in all aspects of the course.

Expectations: An in depth systematic survey of the structure and function of the human body, this course is a lab oriented course which includes dissections. Curriculum for this class is designed to introduce students pursuing a career in medicine to the structure and function of the human body. Students are expected to complete 3-5 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects as well as a research-based projects and presentations.

563 Introduction to Marine Science and Aquarium Care Level: H 1 STE Credit
Grade 11, 12

Prerequisites: A grade of B- or better in both Biology 1 and Chemistry 1 and general understanding of physics and mathematics. Students who do not meet these prerequisites will be expected to participate in additional support in order to be successful in this class.

Prerequisite Skills: Honors level Marine Science requires students to use critical thinking, problem solving, basic plumbing tool use, analytical and basic laboratory skills to be successful in all aspects of the course.

Expectations: This course is designed for those students interested in pursuing a career in marine science or the aquarium hobby industry. Curriculum for Marine Science introduces students to biotic and abiotic factors of the marine environment, along with maintenance, care, design, and animal selection for a saltwater reef tank. Course topics include aquarium design; aquarium maintenance and animal husbandry; major physical, chemical and geological properties of the ocean; marine biology and ecology; structure and functions of marine ecosystems; and human interactions with the sea. Lab component includes advanced chemical water analysis; microscope work; gross anatomy of organisms; and taxonomy. Students are expected to complete 2-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects as well as a research-based project and presentation.

562 Introduction to Marine Science Level: CP                                 1 STE Credit
Grade 11, 12
Prerequisites: Biology 1, Chemistry 1 and general understanding of physics and mathematics. Students who do not meet these prerequisites will be expected to participate in additional support in order to be successful in this class.

Prerequisite Skills: College Prep level Marine Science requires students to use critical thinking, problem solving, analytical and basic laboratory skills to be successful in all aspects of the course.

Expectations: Curriculum for Marine Science introduces students to biotic and abiotic factors of the marine environment. Course topics include aquarium maintenance and basic animal care; major physical, chemical and geological properties of the ocean, marine biology and ecology, structure and functions of marine ecosystems, and human interactions with the sea. Lab component includes microscope work; gross anatomy of organisms; taxonomy and basic water analysis. Students are expected to complete 2-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects as well as a research-based project and presentation.

567 Astronomy Level: Honors                                                       1 STE Credit
Grade 11, 12
Prerequisites: Biology 1, Chemistry 1 and general understanding of physics and mathematics. Students who do not meet these prerequisites will be expected to participate in additional support in order to be successful in this class.

Prerequisite Skills: Honors level Astronomy requires students to use critical thinking, analytical and basic laboratory skills to be successful in all aspects of the course.

Expectations: Curriculum for this class will provide students an introduction to astronomy, starting with the Earth-Moon system, working outward to the rest of the solar system (planets, the Sun). Additionally, students will explore the structure and life cycle of stars, using our Sun as a model star; the structure and movement of galaxies, using our own Milky Way as a model system; structure, evidence and influence of black holes; cosmology; and SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence). A variety of text and media will be used. A working knowledge of chemistry and physics is helpful. Students can expect to complete 3-5 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects as well as a research-based project and presentation.

575 Bioethical Issues Level: CP                                                  1 STE Credit
Prerequisites: Completion of Biology 1                                                                             Grade 11, 12

Prerequisite Skills: Bioethical Issues requires students to use reading skills as well as strong critical thinking skills to integrate materials from a variety of sources and content areas.

Expectations: An interdisciplinary topic, Bioethics combines sciences, including genetics, medicine, and ecology, along with law, philosophy, history, and pedagogy. Issues covered are relevant to everyday life. The cases presented require students to revisit areas they have previously learned in other science courses to study the topics presented in this course. Problem solving, comparing and contrasting, explaining, listening, writing, decision making, and discussion will be important aspects of this course. Students can expect to complete 2-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects as well as a research-based projects and presentations. Students receiving Honors credit will be expected to complete additional work as directed by the teacher as well as complete some more advanced work independently. Please note that this course is not considered a lab science course.

571 Bioethical Issues Level: Honors                                  1 STE Credit
Prerequisites: Completion of Biology 1                                                                                Grade 11, 12

Prerequisite Skills: Bioethical Issues requires students to use reading skills as well as strong critical thinking skills to integrate materials from a variety of sources and content areas.

Expectations: An interdisciplinary topic, Bioethics combines sciences, including genetics, medicine, and ecology, along with law, philosophy, history, and pedagogy. Issues covered are relevant to everyday life. The cases presented require students to revisit areas they have previously learned in other science courses to study the topics presented in this course. Problem solving, comparing and contrasting, explaining, listening, writing, decision making, and discussion will be important aspects of this course. Students can expect to complete 3-5 hours per week (Honors level) of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects as well as a research-based projects and presentations. Students receiving Honors credit will be expected to complete additional work as directed by the teacher as well as complete some more advanced work independently. Please note that this course is not considered a lab science course.

505 Forensics Level: CP                                                    0.5 Credit
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology                                                                Grades 10-12

Expectations: Curriculum for this 0.5 credit elective science course will feature lab activities dealing with various aspects of forensic science. Topics included will be fingerprinting, DNA analysis, blood typing, blood pattern analysis, comparative anatomy, and the chemical analysis of drugs, poisons, and trace evidence. An additional feature of this class will be a series of labs using the Vernier lab analysis equipment. Each lab is preceded by a short scenario that introduces the concepts or methods to be addressed in the lab. These introductory sequences are designed to develop the analytical skills and to help students determine a variety of forensic techniques. Students are expected to complete a Case Analysis for each activity that relates to the concepts and techniques addressed in the lab, and to “solve” the crime introduced in the scenario with the data they collect.

506 Botany Level: CP                                                       0.5 Credit
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology                                                                Grade 10-12

Expectations: Botany is the study of plants and their relationship to the environment. In this course students are expected to investigate the plant kingdom by studying the growth, function, reproduction and ecology of plants. Curriculum for this course will emphasize plant identification (mainly local flora) and will include laboratory and outdoor experiences to complement

860 Introduction to Computer Science Level: H 1 Credit
Prerequisites: None Grade 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite Skills: Students should possess strong analytical and numeracy skills as well as have basic computer skills including keyboarding and file management.

Expectations: Students are introduced to programming using the Java programming language. Object-oriented methodology will be used throughout the course. The students are expected to learn the syntax and semantics of a large part of the Java language, and be exposed to the criteria for developing well-structured, readable and maintainable programs. The first semester of the course will provide the basic skills of programming, including class definition, method definition, procedural use of methods, variables and operators, and control flow with conditionals and loops. The second semester will address more advanced concepts in object-oriented programming. Students are expected to work on individual assignments as well as group projects. Students can expect to complete 1-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects.

870 Educational and Media Technology Level: CP 0 .5 credit
Prerequisites: None                                                                                                                 Grade 9-12

Prerequisite Skills: Students should have basic computer skills including keyboarding and file management.

Expectations: Curriculum for this course is to prepare students to fully utilize the emerging Web 2.0 technologies to enhance learning including career and college readiness. Students will develop proficiency in wikis, blogs, podcasting, vodcasting, and other emerging social media technology. Both the development of skills and an understanding of the norms of e-communication will be emphasized in this course. Curriculum for this course includes a practical component as students share their newly developed knowledge by supporting students and faculty members. Students will work on individual assignments as well as group projects. Students can expect to complete 1-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. This course will be offered every other day for the entire year.

822 CAD1 (Computer Aided Design 1) Level: CP             1 Credit
Grade 9- 12
Prerequisites: Algebra I or Geometry, completed or taken concurrently. Students who do not meet these prerequisites will be expected to participate in additional support in order to be successful in this class.

Prerequisite Skills: CAD1 requires students to have basic computer skills including keyboard, mouse, and file creation/deletion.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete daily in-class assignments and design projects as well as 1-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. Students will develop basic knowledge and skills to effectively convey technical information by creating drawings. These drawings will be done either by hand using manual drafting techniques (such as scaled ruler, compass, and T-square) and with industry standard 2D CAD software (AutoCAD). Careers relating to drafting will be introduced. This course is highly recommended for students interested in technical drawing, interior design & decorating, machining, construction, architecture, or engineering careers.
823 CAD 2 (Computer Aided Design 2) Level: H          1 Credit
Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed CAD 1         .              Grade 10, 11, 12

Prerequisite Skills: CAD 2 is a second-year CAD course. It requires students to have mastered CAD skills learned during CAD 1. Students must be able to pay close attention to detail and be able to visualize 3-dimensional objects.
Expectations: Students are expected to complete daily in-class assignments and hands-on design projects as well as complete 1-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. Students will further develop CAD skills by learning new 2D-CAD techniques of increasing complexity, such as geometric constraints and dimensional tolerancing. Students will also be introduced to 3D parametric modeling programs (such as Autodesk Inventor and Revit) to create 3D mechanical parts & architectural models as well as the associated drawings. Students will further explore careers related to drafting and design. This course is highly recommended for students interested in technical drawing, interior design & decorating, machining, construction, architecture, or engineering careers.

824 CAD 3 (Computer Aided Design 3) Level: H 1 Credit Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed CAD 2.                Grade 11, 12

Prerequisite Skills: CAD 3 is a third-year CAD course. It requires students to have mastered CAD skills learned in prior CAD classes. Students must be able to pay close attention to detail and be able to visualize 3-dimensional objects.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete daily in-class assignments and hands-on design projects as well as 1-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. Students will further their knowledge of 3D parametric modeling software (including Autodesk Inventor and Revit) by learning modeling tools of increasing complexity, such as lofts and sweeps, assembly modeling, realistic rendering, etc. Students will further explore careers related to drafting and design. This course is highly recommended for students interested in technical drawing, machining, construction, architecture, or engineering careers.

825 CAD 4 (Computer Aided Design 4) Level: H       1 Credit
Prerequisites: Students must have successfully completed CAD 3.                         Grade12

Prerequisite Skills: CAD 4 is a fourth-year CAD course. It requires students to have mastered CAD skills learned in prior CAD classes. Students must be able to pay close attention to detail and be able to visualize 3-dimensional objects.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete daily in-class assignments and hands-on design projects as well as 1-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading, and projects. Students will master skills required for 3D parametric modeling software (including Autodesk Inventor and Revit) by learning modeling tools of increasing complexity, including complex part modeling techniques and advanced assembly modeling techniques, sheet metal modeling, etc. Students will further explore careers related to architecture and engineering. This course is highly recommended for students interested in technical drawing, machining, construction, architecture, or engineering careers.

507 Introduction to Engineering Level: CP 0.5 Credit
Prerequisite: None                                                                                                              Grades 10-12
Expectations: Curriculum for this half-year course provides students with hands-on activity- and problem-based experiences in the core engineering disciplines while practicing the engineering design process. Students are expected to work as teams to complete projects while developing problem-solving skills as well as research methodology and engineering standards. Students are expected to learn to document their work and communicate their solutions. Students will use 3D solid modeling software to compliment mechanical projects. Curriculum for this course this course aims to expose students to career possibilities in engineering and assumes no prior knowledge of the subject.

711 Video Production Basics Level: CP                  0.5 Credit
Prerequisite: None                                                                                                              Grade 9-12

Expectations: Video Production Basics is a year- long alternating day condensed version of Introduction to Video Production. Curriculum for this course will introduce students to the basics of video production and digital editing, as well as media literacy and other important aspects of film making. Working in groups students will be responsible for creating a variety of High Definition content ranging from Public Service Announcements, to short films, and music videos. Students are also responsible for the recording of programs including outside school events, sports, and concerts each semester. All projects are broadcast on MMTV and on our YouTube Channel at YouTube.com/Melrose High TV. Please note, this course can serve as a substitute for Introduction to Video Production prerequisites, but both courses may not be taken.
713 Introduction to Video Production Level: CP 1 Credit
Prerequisites: None                                                                                                            Grade 9-12

Prerequisite Skills: The ability to work both alone and in groups.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete 1-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading and projects. Introduction to Video Production serves as a starting point for learning the skills of both studio and field productions. Students will learn skills such as: Camerawork, Editing with Final Cut Pro, Script Writing, and Storyboarding. Each student is required to do TWO remote shoots per semester. Remotes include recording things like concerts, events, meetings, and sports. All projects produced will be broadcast on Melrose Public Access, as well as uploaded to our YouTube Channel (Youtube.com/MelroseHighTV). Students are expected to earn a B or higher demonstrate the standards for responsible production and care of equipment as a prerequisite for Intermediate Production.

714 Intermediate Video Production Level: CP 1 Credit
Grade 10-12
Prerequisites: Students are eligible for this class only if they have a B average or above in Introduction to Video Production (TV1 & TV2). Teacher approval indicating that the student has upheld the standards of responsible production including the use of Video Production equipment is required.

Prerequisite Skills: The Ability to work both alone and in groups as well as an understanding of the production process and the technology that accompanies it.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete 1-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading and projects. Projects will include short films, PSAs, Skits and other more increasingly complex projects. Each student is required to do TWO remote shoots per semester. Remotes include recording things like concerts, events, meetings, and sports. All projects produced will be broadcast on Melrose Public Access, as well as uploaded to our YouTube Channel (Youtube.com/MelroseHighTV).

722 Advanced Video Production Level: CP             1 Credit
Grade 11, 12
Prerequisites: Students are eligible for this class only if they have a B average or above in Intermediate Video Production. Teacher approval indicating that the student has upheld the standards of responsible production including the use of Video Production equipment is required.

Prerequisite Skills: The Ability to work both alone and in groups as well as an understanding of the production process and the technology that accompanies it.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete 1-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading and projects. Projects will include short films, PSAs, Skits and other more increasingly complex projects. The second half of the year will focus on producing Documentaries on subjects determined by the students. Each student is required to do TWO remote shoots per semester. Remotes include recording things like concerts, events, meetings, and sports. All projects produced will be broadcast on Melrose Public Access, as well as uploaded to our YouTube Channel (Youtube.com/MelroseHighTV).

715 Broadcast Journalism Level: CP                       1 Credit
Grade 11, 12
Prerequisites: Students are eligible for this class only if they have a B average or above in Intermediate Video Production. Teacher approval indicating that the student has upheld the standards of responsible production including the use of Video Production equipment is required.

Prerequisite Skills: The Ability to work both alone and in groups as well as an understanding of the production process and the technology that accompanies it.

Expectations: Students are expected to complete 1-3 hours per week of independent practice such as homework, reading and projects. Broadcast Journalism is responsible for MHS-TV News, the news show that is regularly produced by and for MHS students. Writing news stories and being on camera talent is a requirement. Elements of production and post-production learned in Introduction, Intermediate and Advanced Video will be utilized here. All projects produced will be broadcast on Melrose Public Access, as well as uploaded to our YouTube Channel (Youtube.com/MelroseHighTV).

999 Student Technology Integration Level: CP 1 or          0.5 Credit
Prerequisite: Students must have either completed or be co-enrolled in Computer Science. Grades 10-12

Expectations: Students enrolled in this course will develop the skills to support classmates and educators in educational technology integration. Students will be expected to assess and troubleshoot problems related to technology. As part of this problem, they may need to diagnose simple technological problems and develop either a plan of action for solving the problem or identify resources for the future resolution of the problem. In addition to solving problems, students will be required to complete and maintain several projects that expand the knowledge of educational technology integration in our school community. Students can enroll in the course meeting every day or every other day

899 Technology and Society Seminar Level: CP 0.5 Credit
Grade 11, 12
Prerequisite Criteria: An interest in technology and strong research skills are recommended but not required.

Expectations and Course Objectives: Information is the currency of the 21st century and understanding how information is used by individuals, firms, and governments is essential to becoming an informed citizen and user of technology. This course will focus on major issues and themes in technology: privacy, social media, personal information, net neutrality, equity and access, and intellectual property, among others. Classes will be primarily devoted to group discussion supported by reading done outside of class. The class will be reading and research intensive – students will be required to read for each class but supplement regular assignments with current events, podcasts, videos, and documentaries.